Arrival of spring weather could lead to chronic pain issues


We all know the feeling that comes with the first great day of spring. When the sun is shining, the air smells sweet and fresh and the temperatures are warm, we all feel the urge to get outside and throw off the confinement of the winter months.

Whether you’re an avid athlete, a dedicated gardener or someone who’s been meaning to get started on an exercise program, the arrival of spring is one sure way to get you moving.

No one is immune from the desire to get outdoors and do something active while enjoying the weather—and that includes people with chronic pain issues.

Whether you’re dealing with arthritis or trying to treat carpal tunnel syndrome, the threat of pain is one of the most challenging obstacles to overcome for those who want to live an active lifestyle, because no one wants to take the risk of aggravating their health problems.

But even if you’re living with pain, it’s essential to heed the call of the outdoors this spring and be active. There are plenty of ways to mitigate pain issues and avoid further injury.

The important thing is to consult your doctor and to work out a plan together that will let you get the exercise you want and need without worsening your pain. And, in fact, exercising can be an important part of overcoming some of those issues—as long as it’s done in the right way.

There are a lot of activities that we all love to do activities that require repetitive motion. Tennis is a popular sport for all ages, and a game that can be played over a lifetime. But for people suffering from joint pain and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), the repeated swinging motions required for a good volley can drive them off the court.

Similarly, gardeners eager to get their hands in the dirt can be limited by pain that crops up with the repetitious motion involved in tilling, preparing beds, digging and planting.

For people suffering from CTS, whether they are gardeners, tennis players or otherwise, supportive gloves can provide the relief they need.

One example, IMAK’s SmartGlove, features a comfortably flexible support splint that keeps hands in a good position without being stiff, and helps to relieve or prevent carpal tunnel syndrome. It’s ideal for active lifestyles because it is breathable and washable, and it’s an effective non-surgical treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

According to the Mayo Clinic, exercise is an important part of dealing with back pain. Not only does it strengthen the muscles and joints, but it can stretch contracted muscles, improve posture and even help protect against injury by improving your overall fitness.

Another health problem that exercise can positively affect is arthritis.

When you go outside and start being active this spring, you can help your arthritis with activities like tai chi, strengthening exercises and cardio exercise that get your heart working.

It’s recommended that you protect your joints by warming them up prior to exercise, and by being gentle on your body—starting out too hard and fast can cause problems.

Don’t resist the urge to soak in the sunshine because of pain and discomfort this spring. Not only is getting outside easier than ever with supportive therapies, but it’s an essential part of living a healthier, pain-free life.

—Courtesy of ARAcontent


Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.