It?s possible to find humor in misery

The cold and flu bug hit home with a vengeance in recent days. Not that it?s a surprise to anyone, as everybody seems to be battling the same thing. I had been hoping the virus would stay away this year. Alas, t?was not to be.

The usual list of symptoms indicating the presence of a cold or flu bug is evident: stuffy head, nose and ears, not to mention the sore, scratchy throat, slight fever and that dizzy feeling one has when getting up. Or when the floor appears to be rising to meet the face or seems to be moving around in circles, it?s not a good sign.

The good news is it could have been much worse. While in high school, I spent an entire, unforgettable week in bed and in that other, unmentionable room. The only good thing to come from that experience: my performance at the next basketball game could not have been better.

Even so, I would not recommend repeating the entire week in the hope of making a repeat performance on the court. It?s not worth the pain and suffering for 15 minutes of glory.

The current epidemic has affected everyone. Last week, I attended the National Associa?tion of Wheat Growers fall board meeting near Salt Lake City, Utah, and most attendees were fighting the same illness.

On more than one occasion, I overheard an attendee respond when a person offered an outstretched hand, ?I?m not shaking anybody?s hands today.?

As someone once said, when you receive lemons, turn it into lemonade. Perhaps it?s possible to find humor in one?s misery.

n You know you have a cold when you can sing bass, even though it was impossible to sing a note that low before.

n You know you have a cold when you can sing off key and not even care, much less hear the screeching note.

n You know you have a cold or flu bug when that six-pack of dainty wipes is used up in two days.

n You know you have a cold or flu bug when your comments make less sense than usual.

n You know you have a cold or flu bug when your spouse makes more sense than usual.

n You know you have a cold or flu bug when you answer to the name of ?Rudolph, the Red Nosed Reindeer.?

Perhaps it is possible that good can come of all this posturing, of consciously modifying one?s behavior in order to prevent the spread of the flu virus. I?ve observed more people practicing good hygiene while using public restrooms.

In times past, I could hardly contain my alarm while observing what I perceived to be a majority of men walking out of restrooms in the airport without using disinfectant soap and water.

So, as they say, there?s a silver lining in every dark cloud. Hurray for better hygiene!