You can be a contributor to history


Or to the early 19th century, on Lewis & Clark’s course, setting camp between an unwelcoming tribe of Sioux and the Rocky Mountains.

Or maybe into a dark gym with the deafening backbeat of “Mony Mony,” enveloped by inches upon inches of teased bangs and oversized Aerosmith T-shirts. (Wait, that’s my high school homecoming dance. Never mind, I’ll leave that indefinitely and safely hidden in the past.)

There’s always a 1940s newsroom with an ace reporter in a fedora hat, pounding out his scoop story that will stop the presses.

Newly added to the top of my list—the ’60s. I just missed them the first time around and I’m convinced that it was the place—and time—to be. The Beatles, JFK, Martin Luther King Jr., Woodstock…are you kidding?

And who wouldn’t want to throw on a patched skirt and flash the peace sign from a psychedelic VW bus?

Maybe I’ve seen too many movies. (That’s a plug for “Across the Universe.” You have to see it.) But the history I’ve seen on film and in pictures is enough to make me put these on the top of my time travel itinerary.

During those moments none of those people—the flappers, news men and women and especially the youth of the ’60s—dwelled on creating history.

Being as apolitical as they come, I don’t have a good argument regarding any election, political candidate or party.

Despite my opinions, I’m not the one to jump in to defend or persuade because honestly, I’m not convinced there is a best choice when it comes to presidential candidates in general.

And if there is, I’m not informed enough to convince anyone else.

Maybe I have a hard time seeing the big picture of how one party’s philosophy will make or break our future. I work on a much smaller scale, which I hope isn’t irresponsible.

I can see the destruction that follows some government decisions, but if I had to blame somebody, I wouldn’t know where to point my finger. The media like to explain that, but I’m on to them, too.

Maybe this mentality comes from growing up in a very small community, where at that time, the big picture seemed to extend as far as the county line. It could just be my own political ignorance. Or maybe it comes from a mind your own business attitude, which only holds up until you look it over and say, “Hey, this is my business.”

Still, something tells me that we’re in the middle of an era that people will dream of traveling back to one day. It feels like a crossroads. Maybe even in some obscure way, reminiscent of the ’60s.

People are calling for change and voter turnout is on the rise. And that long fight for a fair playing field for any capable person? We’re there. There’s much more involvement from previously indifferent parts of society.

This presidential race has been endless and ugly but it goes on. And I’m interested. So are plenty of others who not so long ago, weren’t.

We can’t all be political experts but we can still be aware and be a part of the process. It’s our right and it’s alright to believe “it’s gonna be all right.”


Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.