More to say about time in Oregon


I didn’t have room last week to report everything from our trip out west. If I’m boring you, please let it go.

We decided to check one bag since we would be gone for eight days and it’s hard to get everything in a carry-on. Plus, we had seven pounds of Hillsboro sau­sage to take with us for a barbecue we had planned.

Without a proper scale, it’s hard to judge how much a big bag actually weighs; if it exceeds 50 pounds the price goes up drastically. I stood on our bathroom scale and first weighed myself and then picked up the bag and weighed it along with me.

The problem is I couldn’t see the dial. I think you get the picture. When we checked in at Mid-Continent the scale showed 49.5 and then after a few seconds tipped to 50 on the dot. Score one for us.

I am very proud to say I didn’t watch any TV for eight days, and given what we were up to, didn’t miss it one bit. When you are around that many family members and friends there really isn’t any use for it.

One thing that stood out for me is that the trees in Oregon are so big and tall that our trees in Kansas look like bushes.

The biggest obstacle in getting home was going from Pacific time to Central time. I felt like I was a day off for the remainder of last week. I’m not sure if I am back on track yet.

The grandsons brought with them two of the “toys” they are now into. Louie has a Long Board, which is like a skate board on steroids, and Alex has a Slack Line that he walks across about 18 inches off the ground.

With the huge trees in Ore­gon it was easy to stretch the line between two trees. Not sure how we will do that in Kansas.

He almost walked 50 feet without falling off of the line. I told him we would make a balancing pole like Nik Wallenda used and his name will be Alex Camellenda.

Hillsboro streets will work just fine for the Long Board.

I mentioned last week that I had hoped to float down the Deschutes River on an air mattress before we left Bend. Since the water was so cold, I thought if I floated on an air mattress I could stay dry—and did until I got to the place in the river where you get out.

The water was only about a foot deep so when I stepped off of the mattress I didn’t see a sharp rock, and in trying to shift my weight to the other foot I stepped on a slippery rock and fell in and got 100 percent wet anyway. Oh well.

On the way back through the Redmond airport, my pea-sized brain was at work again. I remembered right after I checked our big bag that I had forgotten to put my pocket knife in it. Trying to think of a solution, I thought I would text Dan and tell him where I had hidden the knife outside on his next trip to the airport. Instead, I went to the counter and asked if they could get my bag back so I could slip the knife in it. Fortunately, it hadn’t gone far yet and I was able to throw it in one of the pockets.

It’s a good thing our grandsons are arriving this week instead of last week—or we wouldn’t have survived it.

If you wish to share your comments or ideas, my e-mail address is joel@hillsborofree press.com.


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