Book will mark 150th for Marion


Marion is celebrating its 150 birthday this year—which most of you already know—and which happens to be the sesquicen­tennial for state of Kansas.

At first I had problems being able to say “sesquicentennial,” but now with practice it flows off of my tongue quite fluidly. If you need help saying the word, it is pronounced this way: seskwisen’ten??l.

There are other significant milestones in Marion in addition to its sesquicentennial. Old Settler’s Day is celebrating 100 years, the hospital is celebrating 100 years of health-care services in Marion and the Marion Historical Museum is reaching its 50th anniversary.

To help celebrate these events and commemorate Marion’s history we are publishing another photo book “Marion Memories, Vol. 2—Images of Faith, Hope and Heritage,” which is available now at a pre-publication discounted price.

We want to thank everyone who brought in their old photos and were willing to share them, along with assistance from St. Luke Hospital and Foundation, Hannaford Abstract and Title Co., and Marion Historical Museum.

The finishing touches are going into the book right now, and the book will be released in St. Luke’s new lobby on the Thursday before Old Settler’s Day. Watch for details.

It interests me that sometimes people we have known along the way in previous work situations have faded from of our lives—and then all of a sudden they are back in.

A lot can happen in 10 years or more. Recently, a nice woman I used to call on in Hutchin­son contacted me about helping her with a book that her church was planning to publish. It is great to get reacquainted and learn what has transpired in all of those years. When I last knew her, she had a daughter in high school. Now she has a grandchild.

The breakfast we enjoyed this past Saturday morning at the Senior Center wasn’t your ordinary fundraiser food. If you missed it, my advice is to not miss the next one they have.

I figured out I do need to go back to school. If I was enrolling in high school, I would be in the 60th grade—not 59th, like I wrote last week.

I want to thank Irene Seibel who, in response to my question last week, called to say yearbooks were not produced at Hillsboro High School during the war years.

The 1940 book could be used for 1940 and 1941, but I will need to be creative for the 1942-45 years. The books start again in 1946.

This is the year of the fresh tomato scarcity. I was instructed to buy some tomatoes if I could find them last week at the farmer’s market.

I did manage to find a few and the vendor asked me if I wanted a rain gauge. Before I could give an intelligent answer he handed me a bottle cap just for fun.

We’re looking forward to a visit from son Dan and Katie in a few weeks. He hasn’t been in Kansas for more than two years and she about four years.

We’ve actually seen them quite a few times in the past couple of years, just not here. I’m hoping to take advantage of a few of his carpentry skills.

If you wish to share your comments or ideas, my e-mail address is joel@hillsborofreepress.com.


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