Rain couldn’t dampen that threshing spirit

Parade onlookers either braved the light rain that fell Saturday morning, or took cover under umbrellas. The cool, wet weather was a radical change from the summer heat of the past few years.
Parade onlookers either braved the light rain that fell Saturday morning, or took cover under umbrellas. The cool, wet weather was a radical change from the summer heat of the past few years.
After a series of several summer sun-baked celebrations, cooler weather provided a respite from the usual heat over the weekend at Goessel’s 2016 Country Thresh­ing Days.

Despite the light rain that fell Saturday morning, Bren­don Nafziger, secretary/treasurer of the board of The WHEAT Co., said attendance was similar to last year. He said the event drew around 950 paid attendees, not including 150 exhibitors and an estimated 200 to 300 children who got into the event free of charge.

“Even though the cool weather definitely was a nice thing, we may be affected by rain as much as we are by heat on attendance,” Naf­ziger said. “But it’s very similar to what it has been the last number of years.”

The event, and the cooler temperatures, were well-received.

“I think it went over pretty well,” Nafziger said. “A lot of people were talking about the nice cool weather. With the rain, we weren’t able to do quite the field demonstrations that we typically do. But all in all, I think people felt pretty good about it.”

This year, event organizers brought back a running steam engine, something that has not been part of Country Threshing Days for a number of years. The steam engine was used to run the sawmill and a threshing machine.

Nafziger spoke to the historical and educational nature of the event.

“It’s a good time for a lot of people,” he said. “It’s very educational. We try to stress the education of it, especially to the younger generation.

“A lot of what we demonstrate there and show is something that even if you’re a younger farmer, it is maybe stuff that you haven’t seen before and haven’t experienced. It’s a way to keep the history alive.”