Goessel students learn about cider making

Students at Goessel Elementary School got the chance to make fresh apple cider from the school's apple trees.
Students at Goessel Elementary School got the chance to make fresh apple cider from the school's apple trees.
Just in time for fall, all of the Goessel Elementary School students recently got a lesson in making apple cider and then each one had an opportunity to sample fresh apple cider. This was all coordinated by school gardener and teacher Pam Abrahams.

The apples were harvested from apple trees planted near the school garden a few years ago. Abrahams brought her extended family to help cut apples and operate the press.

“The school has several apple trees, but we do not spray the apples. Most years I don’t do anything with them, because they are too buggy to take to the school kitchen,” said Abrahams.

But this year was different. Abrahams decided to put the apples to good use.

“The cider-making was my sister-in-law’s idea. Her parents have a cider press, so they came along and brought the press. We set it up at school and all classes, preschool through fifth grade came out for a demonstration. The process does not allow for a lot of student participation, so they were observing,” said Abrahams. “The students seemed very interested in the process, asked good questions, and many were surprised by how sweet the cider was.”

Students at Goessel Elementary School got the chance to make fresh apple cider from the school's apple trees.
Students at Goessel Elementary School got the chance to make fresh apple cider from the school's apple trees.
Abrahams and her family enjoyed the time they spent with the students showing them how it all worked. But one part in particular stood out.

“My favorite part was probably the students’ reactions to trying the cider and their requests for more. It was also fun to have some of my husband’s family come out to help. Something I loved about the whole process of cider-making, as well as students working in the garden, is that they learn more about where their food comes from. I think students are more likely to try something when they have seen how it’s made or helped grow it in the garden,” said Abrahams.

Superintendent and Principal John Fast said that the students enjoyed the activity and thanked Abrahams for providing the opportunity for the school.