Centre partners win third annual

Youth Entrepreneurship Challenge

Economic development directors Anthony Roy of Hillsboro and Randy Collett of Marion congratulate the winners of the third annual Marion County Youth Entrepreneurship Challenge, partners Cole Srajer and Max Svoboda from Centre High School.
Economic development directors Anthony Roy of Hillsboro and Randy Collett of Marion congratulate the winners of the third annual Marion County Youth Entrepreneurship Challenge, partners Cole Srajer and Max Svoboda from Centre High School.
Eight high school business teams competed in the third annual Marion County Youth Entrepreneurship Challenge March 6 in the Wohlgemuth Music Education Center on the Tabor College campus.

The winning business team was Cole Srajer and Max Svoboda from Centre High School for the business, “Cole’s Cards.”

In recognition for their work, the team received $1,000.

Business description

Srajer is the owner of the business, Svoboda is the financial administrator and Braxton Smith is sales representative.

Srajer said the projected first-year revenue was estimated at about $9,000 with $2,267 in funding sought.

“Cole’s Cards is a sports card and memorabilia business founded June 27, 2017, with the intent of making some extra money for college while enjoying a hobby,” Srajer said.

The advantage of people using Cole’s Cards site is that customers can grow their sports memorabilia collections at affordable prices while avoiding inconvenient eBay fees, Svoboda said.

The target market for Cole’s Cards is anyone interested in sports memorabilia or sports in general.

Since Cole’s Cards is on Twitter and Instagram, anyone can access it at anytime, Srajer said.

Cole’s Cards has nearly doubled the projected income of $8,931 with an average income of $14,234 over three years.

Second-place business

Nothin’ But Nut with Samantha Richmond and Zach Stuchlik of Marion High School received home second place honors and a check for $600.

The business is selling inexpensive and delicious treats for everyday snacks as well as holiday gifts, the duo explained.

The business operates out of Marion High School. Fellow students are good customers because by midday they are ready for a quick snack.

Regarding growth potental, Stuchlik said the industry of seasoned and flavored nuts is stable and should continue to be stable due to both the demand for an easy, inexpensive gift or snack and because it is consumable, repeat customers are likely.

The monthly profit potential for the business is $168, but after paying for supplies, average monthly gross income is predicted at $72.

Nothin’ But Nut required $213 in startup money for nuts, ingredients, supplies and packaging.

“We took out a loan from Central National Bank for $225 and predicted it would only take a year to pay it off—it took five months,” Richmond said.

Third place gets $300

Braxton Smith’s business, Look Extra, is an online store creating a service for a supplier of goods.

“I request permission from them to sell and advertise their products,” he said. “The difference between what I end up selling the product for and what the supplier wants for the product is my profit.”

Smith said when he shows increased sales to his client he is able to negotiate commission from their growth. The percentage, he added, is based off two six months averages in sales.

Smith’s projected income statement came in years one, two and three at $40,000, $100,000 and $160,000 for a total of $300,000—an average of $100,000.

Gross profits ended in year one at $6,000, year two at $14,000, year three at $20,000 and the total was $40,000, making the average per year at $13,333.

People’s Choice

C&A Laser Design with Collin Brown and Avery Unruh of Hillsboro High School received the People’s Choice Award for their 50-50 laser engraving partnership.

“We have an agreement through the school stating that we can use their laser engraver to make money for ourselves through this class as long as the school gets 30 percent profit of what we make,” Brown said.

Unruh added that using designs or images on their glasses, bricks or another engravable object are good suggestions.

“Out target market is local clubs, organizations or groups of people associated with the Hillsboro school district that would order in bulk load,” Unruh said.

Other entrepreneurs with a business included:

◼ JLB Custom Knives: Jacob Bittle at Centre High School USD 397;

◼ Captured in Time Photography: Jessi Dalke at Hillsboro High School;

◼ Hook ’Em Lures: Logan Oborny of Hillsboro High School.

Both Randy Collett, director of economic development for the city of Marion, and Anthony Roy, director of economic development for the city of Hillsboro were present for the day’s activities.

Additional sponsors of the Youth Entrepreneurship Challenge included Barkman Honey, Ag Service, Ag Power, Container Services Inc. and CB Baked Goods.