Williams named Marion economic-development director

ORIGINALLY WRITTEN JERRY ENGLER
The Marion City Commission announced Monday that Jami Williams, community business activist and chairman of the Marion Chamber of Commerce, has been appointed the city’s economic director, effective Jan. 1.

Williams has been active in the Marion Advancement Campaign and a number of other community programs to advance the city. She, husband Stan and their three children are longtime residents of the city.

Cynthia Blount, Marion Museum director, reported 1,307 total visitors to the museum this year compared to 1,100 last year. That number included 727 in-county, 263 out-of-county, 311 out-of-state, and six international visitors.

Items donated this year included a model of Canada School from Monroe Kreutziger, a photo of the Marsh Arch Bridge near Marion from Rosie Plenert, an IBM typewriter from Eloise Mueller, Richardson diaries and transcripts of the diaries from Dorothy Weber, a World War I photo from Carol Pierce, a Big Red One plaque and Country Club golf ball embossing dyes from John Brose, an altar Bible and family history from Berdene Rhodes, a Bowlby Clothing Store Receipt Book from Kay Navrat, a post-office dedication program from Virginia Boawers, and five volumes of Hoch family information from Jim Hoch.

Roger Morse donated two folders of poetry by J. L. McHenry, a report card, a junior-high diploma, an attendance award, a best-citizen award, a boys-chorus songbook, two Sunday school newspapers, a Marion High School newspaper, four campaign posters, a Kiwanis folder, a Marion Historical Museum folder, an Old Settler’s Day folder, a Marion High School folder, 20 photos, miscellaneous Marion County Record newspapers, a history of Lehigh, a 1951 flood souvenir booklet, four boxes of slides, a land grant, an appreciation award, a stock certificate, a Kansas facts booklet, two spelling awards, an attendance certificate, dam and reservoir brochures and a 1922 Marion High School annual.

Other donations included a bathtub from Dr. Smith’s home from Terry Colburn, Antelope School treasurer’s books from Greg Bowers and Arnold Boettcher, five U.S. Air Force patches from Dwight Boesker, Dobbs School group photo, Bible school photo and photo album from Jan Vogel, a
WW I roll of honor book and 1963 Marion telephone book from Paul Roberts, a 1902 Marion County Land Atlas from Corinne E. Way, four Marion baseball trophies from Dennis Navrat, a 1955 Marion High School annual from Charles Heerey, woodworking tools and display case from Max Ewert, a sousaphone and drum from the Rube Band by Bill Meyer, a lighted paper cutting from the Presbyterian Church, two slate tiles from the courthouse roof from Earl Winter, a sailor hat for our crying boy and a sidewalk brick from Gary and Bev Helmer.

The commissioners approved the November utility billing tie out with Clerk Becky Makovec reporting with past due bills $47,000 more collected for the month than billed.

After a hearing, City Attorney Dan Baldwin was directed to begin draft of a resolution giving city agreement to a 120-day time frame for owners of a house at 110 South Lincoln to have it torn down.

The commissioners approved a fireworks display for New Year by Davy Hett, who was in charge of such a display last year.

Hett said the display will be by the concrete plant just as last year. He said businessmen have donated $600 toward the display this year while the display last year totaled $240.

Hett also will do the now traditional midnight ball drop down the north side of the co-op elevator rather than down the courthouse flagpole.

In humor, Hett said he would report to Mayor Martin Tice if anything goes wrong although he is sure some of the physical punishment Tice administered in past years was “illegal,” a reference to when he was a student and Tice a principal in the Marion school system.

The commissioners told Public Works Director Harvey Sanders that they liked new white light bulbs he has tried in the downtown area over older sodium vapor bulbs.

Street Superintendent Marty Fredrickson said Corps of Engineers inspectors came to inspect dike maintenance around Marion, and will be making recommendations.

Before naming Williams, the commissioners met in executive session for 15 minutes, and then extended the session for an hour.

They approved paying warrants for $132,025.54.

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