Along The Fencerow

ORIGINALLY WRITTEN BRADLEY GOERING
It has been going strong for about a month now. Every week, they prepare Friday evening for the event. Early Saturday morning it is off to town to set up and be ready to sell at the local farmer’s market.

During the past few years, farmer’s markets in small, medium and large towns across Kansas are becoming commonplace. It is a chance for growers to make a little extra money. In turn, it gives the chance for local people to buy fresh produce and support the local growers.

Each farmer’s market has its own set of rules and bylaws to follow. It gives organization and fairness to everyone participating as a producer.

Some growers may specialize in certain crops, while others show off a variety of vegetables and meat products. There may be a potential for bedding plants, house plants, or cut flower arrangements offered each Saturday as well.

When we’ve attended different ones, it is also a social activity. You meet a variety of people as well as talk “shop” with other venders and pick up new ideas for the challenges you have at your own place.

The goals of each vender may be a little different. For many, as I mentioned before, it is about making a little extra income and a social event. For some it may also be an educational event. Some vendors may take the selling as a stage to discuss food preparation, food safety, or the history behind what they are growing.

As with any business, new customers are important. But repeat business is what pays the bills. Letting your customers know that if they run short for the week with their purchases, remind them that you’ll be back next week. Also, if you are selling something that you can produce throughout the year can be beneficial for both parties as well.

Research shows that it does take three to five years for a market to really come together. Be patient and keep pushing forward. Hard work, persistence and dedication usually result in a successful venture.

Bradley Goering can be reached by e-mail at bgoering@thecsb.com or by telephone at 620-327-4941.

More from article archives
SIDELINE SLANTS
ORIGINALLY WRITTEN JOE KLEINSASSER Is it a sign of the end times...
Read More