It’s hard to be bored these days


Were you ever bored as a kid? I know I was and I know my kids and grand­kids were, too. However, as an adult there are a thousand ways not be bored these days. It’s easy not to be that way if you own a business, serve on a civic or chuch committee, own a house or are in charge of the household, follow sports teams, watch favorite TV shows, have a smart phone, a computer, travel for pleasure and for business, file income taxes and other taxes, fix things, remodel a house or business, and on and on—you get the idea. I haven’t been bored in years.

Nancy and I just returned from the Association of Free Community Papers conference in Denver. We drove this time instead of flying. I had never seen the wind-turbine farm that stretches more than 22 miles west of Salina. I wonder how they decide where to put it; there doesn’t seem to be a pattern that is distinguishable.

As is my nature, I searched the answer on the Internet and learned that they research for quite a few years to determine how the terrain affects the wind speed as well as where the wind speed is the most consistent and the strongest.

I met a vendor from Germany whose company decided to go international this year. I asked him about the Autobahn and he told me he can cover 500 miles in a little more than three hours. And he has a friend who drives even faster.

He said he goes about 300 in kilometers, which translates into about 180 mph. Imagine driving to Denver is less than three hours.

We used the valet parking when we first got to the hotel because I wanted to get away from the car as soon as possible. But after our road trip on Sat­urday afternoon to the mountains, I thought I would use the parking garage myself. It was the same one the hotel used but at much lower cost.

OK, so I got lost in the parking garage Sunday morning, feeling like I would never find my way out—saving the $17 was worth the pain, though.

We took Colfax Avenue out of town coming home, thinking it was a straight shot and would be faster. Wrong. But it was fewer miles.

By doing so we saw a large gathering of what appeared to be homeless folks on the lawn of the state capitol. Or maybe it was a rally of some sort.

Discussions with management personnel from the Postal Service at the conference wasn’t encouraging. With the new system of closing big processing centers, many publisher are finding many more problems than before the changes.

I didn’t know this: If the Postal Service loses your papers, doesn’t deliver them or they get destroyed, there is no recourse for damages or a refund.

Could you imagine the cost of asking for a signature on every paper delivered and the cost of same?

Here is possibly a little known fact about someone who currently works in Hillsboro. He was a “repo man” in his earlier days and had many harrowing experiences doing that job.

While in Denver I had a Denver omelette for breakfast at the Delectable Egg. How could I have chosen anything else?

 

If you wish to share your comments or ideas, my e-mail address is joel@hillsborofreepress.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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